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  1. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    Yes, I understand the nickel that makes stainless steel so stainless is not necessarily good for one either.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4284091/
     
  2. The_Fixer

    The_Fixer Class Clown

    Stainless steel is a metal used on its own. It is formed using iron, chromium and nickel.

    It is formed in the smelting process and is not used in or for electroplating.

    Sometimes it is rolled in conjunction with another metal, such as bronze in a rollforming process known as laminating.

    Zinc is used in either an electroplating or in a heated liquid form as hot dip galvanising for corrosion protection. Sometimes a combination of both processes are used as a hybrid form of coating. It is not considered safe for food containers.

    Tin was used to line tin cans, but I think they use a form of plastic coating in food tins now. This coating does not tend to crack as readily when the tins are damaged. We were always told not to used a food tin can that was damaged or dented.

    I don't know if it's appropriate here, but electricity can simply be explained using water in a pipe(line) analogy.

    Voltage is explained as the water pressure in the pipe.
    Amperage would be the amount of water flow in the pipe.
    Power or Wattage is the product of pressure x flow, or volts x amps.
    Resistance is explained as when you turn the tap on or off in stages to restrict the flow and/or pressure in the pipe.

    That will do for now. Class dismissed.....
     
  3. Dulloldfart

    Dulloldfart Squirrel Extraordinaire

    I am not disputing that an electrical current can transport metallic ions into the body. I well remember tin-smelling hands after sessions. I'm not even disputing this is harmful. The question is how harmful? The body imports poisons from food and the environment (even from wearing metallic jewellery) all day long. Some of it gets removed by the immune system, some doesn't and builds up over a lifetime.

    How harmful is this e-meter ion absorption? Enough for a person to notice? Is there any proof of this?

    Paul
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
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  4. Dulloldfart

    Dulloldfart Squirrel Extraordinaire

  5. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    As I left in the late 70's I'm not up to date on what cans are used with the newer model emeters as they weren't around in my day. I've always wondered why they didn't use the medical grade skin pads that are common with tens units. I even have a pair of socks that work with zappers and tens units so there have been plenty of other alternatives to non-descript soup cans.
     
  6. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    My opinion would be that any electrostatic process that would cause metallic ions to bond to the surface of steel would be a powerful enough process as to cause normally inert metals in the body to congeal and meld into unnatural formations that could occur all over the body and I never would have picked up the cans had I been made aware of the risks I was taking. There is an ample amount of information on the net about metallic toxins and their effects. I even had my silver amalgam fillings all removed in my mouth and replaced by ceramics, that's my level of concern. Even if the process was only capable of electroplating ones metal fillings, that could still lead to systemic toxicity due to the constant bath of saliva upon the metallic buildup not to mention the damage to the teeth.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  7. Dulloldfart

    Dulloldfart Squirrel Extraordinaire

    Fair comment. I got all my mercury fillings (bar a root canal I didn't know I'd had) replaced shortly after I left the SO.

    I guess we can stop fighting now. :)

    Paul
     
  8. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    I also have to wonder about the effects of all the hand lotion on the metallic coating of the cans. Did the hand lotion soften up the can surface and allow for a more rapid ionic transport of the metallic coating? Who knows? The disappearance of the can coating surface only occurred where the hands made contact with the cans and not near the electrode clips as I recall. Most studies and subsequent experiments begin with opinions and theories as they are a vital part of the process of discovery. Without the initial curiosity very little would have ever been discovered by man.
     
  9. JustSheila

    JustSheila Crusader

    I'd say probably not.

    Most hand lotions consist of mostly paraffin wax (sometimes bees wax), various oils, some sort of fragrance and a small amount of preservative and antiseptic (could be natural, like lavender). They aren't absorbed into the skin beyond the outer layers. The skin acts as a barrier and blocks them out.

    Some contain vitamins like Vit E, which some people believe gets absorbed by the skin, but there is little to no evidence that happens unless the skin is cut or broken. The skin is an organ that blocks and protects unless damaged. It blocks water, for example, which is why wrinkle creams contain humectants (ingredients like honey that bring the skin's own water to the surface).

    (I used to work in skin care and had a lot of training for it.)

    Your skin's natural oils are acidic, so on their own would eventually wear down a can's surface and would increase conductivity, too. But the lubricants and waxes in hand lotions would act as insulators/barriers to conductivity and also slow down any wear on the cans.
     
  10. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    Try taking a few drops of DMSO mixed with a drop of mint oil and placing it in the palm of your hand and taste the mint in your mouth within 2 seconds. I quit using sun tanning lotions including sunscreens, insecticides, hand lotions etc. once I saw that there was no other place for the lotion to go other than in through the skin barrier. The skin barrier may put up a valiant effort to block it out but it does eventually penetrate. I worked in a large conveyor oven company when I first got out of high school and the older guys there had huge health problems from all they absorbed through their skin. The health industry sells medicated skin patches whereby the medicine absorbs through the skin, that's how it gets into your system and is why people wear rubber gloves when working with toxic chemicals.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(skin)
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  11. JustSheila

    JustSheila Crusader

    Yeh, you may be right about that. I'm not sure exactly what goes through the skin and how much or what it takes to be absorbed. Any defect in the skin leaves it open to absorption, though, and there are also the eyes and, as you pointed out, mouth and nose mucous membranes that actually do absorb directly into the body. Your skin would have to be completely undamaged to be completely protective and even then, like you said, it doesn't block out everything. I'm open on this. Just wish there was more definitive research.

    Medication patches use chemicals that the skin apparently accepts.

    Btw, I meant to mention that hand creams can help skin conductivity with the cans by softening the hands so that there is more hand skin surface contact with the cans.
     
  12. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    I found that heat vastly increased my skins absorptive properties when I broke my back and was put on Fentanyl pain patches. Here in Florida I sweat and overheat easily which opens up my pores so wide that the skin would suck in the Fentanyl and I would feel like falling down so I had to discontinue the pain patches. I use a roll on pain remedy product called Salonpas which disperses Lidocaine into the sub dermal tissues and relieves my pain w/o over-medicating me.
     
  13. The_Fixer

    The_Fixer Class Clown

    Just surmising here, but I think sometimes smell plays a part in taste.

    If you can smell something, it sometimes triggers a taste reflex. If you go through a food hall in a mall, the mouth begins to react.

    As for your mention regarding mint, it is a strong smelling herb. Dunno, but it's just a thought.
     
  14. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    And his rotten teeth and purple lips indicated something out of the ordinary going on.
     
  15. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    Except that it's a famous universal solvent and carrier agent that is used for all kinds of ailments from cancer to herpes. You have to watch out what you mix into it because it will be in someones vital organs within seconds of making skin contact. But you can buy it cheaply in many hardware stores and online.
    Medicine
    Use of DMSO in medicine dates from around 1963, when an Oregon Health & Science University Medical School team, headed by Stanley Jacob, discovered it could penetrate the skin and other membranes without damaging them and could carry other compounds into a biological system. In medicine, DMSO is predominantly used as a topical analgesic, a vehicle for topical application of pharmaceuticals, as an anti-inflammatory, and an antioxidant.[19] Because DMSO increases the rate of absorption of some compounds through biological tissues, including skin, it is used in some transdermal drug delivery systems. Its effect may be enhanced with the addition of EDTA. It is frequently compounded with antifungal medications, enabling them to penetrate not just skin but also toenails and fingernails.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimethyl_sulfoxide
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  16. The_Fixer

    The_Fixer Class Clown

    Could it also have been due to all the drugs he used?

    I know about some drugs, but not sure if those ones he used would have the effects on the body the way he displayed.
     
  17. Dulloldfart

    Dulloldfart Squirrel Extraordinaire

    Try putting one drop of lemon juice on your eyelid (not the eyeball). I read that was quite effective at demonstrating the fact that skin absorbs liquids, but was too scared to try it out.

    Paul
     
  18. DagwoodGum

    DagwoodGum Squirreling Dervish

    Yes I remember having to continually reapply more and more hand cream to keep the conductivity level high which again raised the question, where did the last slathering go? Certainly not into the cans nor could it have just evaporated as the hands kept the lotion between them and the cans, nowhere else to go but into the hands. I guess that's why it was designed to be a lotion rather than a conductivity enhancer due to its ability to penetrate the skin surface with resultant tissue saturation.
     
  19. AD1950

    AD1950 Patron

    Thread title concerns Lermanet, no?
     
  20. I told you I was trouble

    I told you I was trouble Suspended animation

    As a certain person used to like to say "threads meander" ... especially once there is nothing much left to add.
     
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